The Contract Documents, including A201–2007, record the Contract for Construction between the Owner and the Contractor. Section 3.3.1 now clarifies the extent of the Owner’s responsibility for the costs associated with Owner-required means and methods of construction. Although the AIA does not produce standard documents for Supplementary Conditions, Drawings or Specifications, a variety of model and guide documents are available, including AIA’s MASTER SPEC and AIA Document, A503™–2017/2019, Guide for Supplementary Conditions, , Agreement Between Owner and Contractor (Stipulated Sum), , Agreement Between Owner and Contractor (Cost Plus Fee, with GMP), , Agreement Between Owner and Contractor (Cost Plus Fee, without GMP), , Agreement Between Owner and Architect for a Large or Complex Project, , Architect’s Services: Design and Construction Contract Administration, , Guide for Amendments to AIA Owner-Architect Agreements, , Agreement Between Architect and Consultant. The Owner and the Contractor have an opportunity to identify an IDM other than the Architect in the Owner-Contractor agreement. They set forth the rights, responsibilities, and relationships of the owner, contractor, and architect. This Commentary highlights the most important changes made in the 2017 edition and offers some recommendations builders may seek to revise if the AIA A201 is thrust upon them. Section 13.7, establishing the time period in which the Owner and Contractor must bring Claims, is amended to more closely follow state statutes of limitations and repose and to require compliance with state law. While arbitration is no longer mandatory in the 2007 Conventional family of documents, Article 15 sets forth the requirements for arbitration if it is the selected method of binding dispute resolution. Section 7.3.9 is now revised to provide a more efficient process for making payments to the Contractor for changes to the Work completed under Construction Change Directives. AIA Document A201–2007, a general conditions form, is considered the keystone document of the Conventional family of documents because it provides the terms and conditions under which the Owner, Contractor, and Architect will work together during the building construction process. The B101-2007 Commentary provides explanations for many of the legal concepts and industry practices influencing the wording of particular B101 provisions. This Commentary highlights the most important changes made in the 2017 edition and offers some recommendations builders may seek to revise if the AIA A201 is thrust upon them. If custom-crafted agreements were written in isolation for each of those contractual relationships, the problems of overlaps and gaps in the numerous participants’ responsibilities could lead to mass confusion and chaos. The Owner and the Contractor have an opportunity to identify an IDM other than the Architect in the Owner-Contractor agreement. Publication of this version of AIA Document A201–2007 does not imply the American Institute of Architects’ endorsement of any modification by . Section 7.3.9 is now revised to provide a more efficient process for making payments to the Contractor for changes to the Work completed under Construction Change Directives. A number of substantial changes have been made to A201–2007. To submit disputes to mediation or arbitration or to obtain copies of the applicable mediation or arbitration rules, contact the American Arbitration Association at (800) 778-7879 or visit the website at, Download a commentary with explanations for many of the legal concepts and industry practices influencing particular A201 provisions. So, at the time of contract, the parties must choose which dispute processes they will agree to use in the event a dispute arises. New Article 15 consists of revised Claims and Disputes language from Article 4 of AIA Document A201–1997. Although the AIA does not produce standard documents for Supplementary Conditions, Drawings or Specifications, a variety of model and guide documents are available, including AIA’s MASTER SPEC and AIA Document A503™–2017/2019, Guide for Supplementary Conditions. AIA Document A201–2007 is adopted by reference in owner/architect, owner/contractor, and contractor/subcontractor agreements in the Conventional family of documents; thus, it is often called the “keystone” document.

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